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  1. I don’t have Snapchat, so I’ll admit that I don’t completely understand this: But the popular messaging app has a new “baby” filter that turns photos of adults into toddlers, and it’s currently all the rage on social media. If you ask me, it’s kind of creepy and weird. I mean, can’t I just look at old baby pictures of myself? But I digress. Not surprisingly, this has become a thing in the sports world. And while I may be out of touch because I don’t use Snapchat, I know an internet trend when I see one. And so do the folks running ESPN’s MMA social media account, because take a look at some of these “baby” photos of UFC fighters. Conor McGregor, Nate Diaz, Jon Jones, Amanda Nunes (via Twitter): Max Holloway and Anderson Silva (via Twitter): UFC heavyweight champion Daniel Cormier, who ESPN included in its original batch of photos, had the best reaction (via Twitter) Hey @espnmma I love the baby fighter photos you did, I didn’t see mine so i figured I’d send it to you It’s a baby goat. Get it? Because he’s the GOAT. Clever guy that “DC” is. Here’s the actual “baby” filter photo of the champ-champ (via Twitter): This concludes our silly blog post about fake baby photos of fighters. As you were. The Blue Corner is MMA Junkie’s blog space. We don’t take it overly serious, and neither should you. If you come complaining to us that something you read here is not hard-hitting news, expect to have the previous sentence repeated in ALL CAPS. Voir l'article complet
  2. Natan Schulte became a freshly minted millionaire during the inaugural season of PFL action, and now he’s coming back for more. The defending lightweight champion kicks off his campaign for back-to-back titles Thursday night at PFL 2019, Week 2, as he meets Bao Yincang on the ESPN+ prelims at Nassau Coliseum in Uniondale, N.Y. MMA Junkie recently caught up with Schulte and talked about last year’s experience and his upcoming fight. Can you talk about coming off a loss, and then going on to win the inaugural million-dollar tournament at the PFL? When I lost to Islam Mamedov at the WSOF, I was pretty sad since I had been on a 10-fight winning streak. I felt I needed to start from scratch to have a chance to get into a promotion like the UFC. When my contract was renewed, after the WSOF become the PFL, I was impressed. They renewed me even though I had just lost. There was only one problem which my coaches and training partners knew about – I had a torn meniscus. I did the entire tournament with that problem, including the final against Rashid Magomedov. It caused a lot of problems. I can talk about it now. My knee didn’t go out of place during my fights, but it always used to happen during training. My knee would shift and stiffen up. I couldn’t get it to go back to its proper place. After I made it past the first opponent, I made up my mind to do my best to try to get to the final. I only trained a few jiu-jitsu positions due to my knee problem. Ultimately, being able to fight through it gave me the confidence that I could beat anyone in front of me. Several fighters like Jon Fitch stated that the PFL would never pay those prizes at the end of the year. What are your thoughts on that? For about four days, the PFL brought us fighters of every weigh class to Orlando to reintroduce themselves, and to take photos and video. Some of the fighters wandered aloud if they were really going to pay the million-dollar prizes at the end. After each card, people started to realize this was for real. It’s normally very hard for someone who isn’t UFC-famous to win a big prize like that. Some people spend their entire careers in the UFC and never make close to a million. I was very happy to earn that money, and make my dream come true – to become an MMA champion. Now, I feel I might be able to train and fight full-time. Previously, I had to have another job to make ends meet. This is true of most fighters, since most promotions pay very little. The guys who won the grand prize are now laughing at those who thought the whole thing was a lie. Now, even after paying taxes, and the usual percentage to my academy and manager, I can train without the stress of having another job to pay the bills. In Brazil, we don’t have much of an investment culture. But I’ve been making investments that yield a higher dividend than a simple savings account. I’m making my money work for me. What can you say about your next opponent, Bao Yincang? I would never underestimate any opponent. Sometimes, someone who seems easy to beat can harden up and rise to the occasion. Guys from Asia, especially, are very resilient. So, we’re going to clash, whether on the feet or on the ground. I’m getting ready as if this was the final again. I plan to show up at 100 percent. My game is the same – I’ll pressure forward until I see an opening for a knockout or submission. How’s your training going? I’ve been training at American Top Team for almost three years now. My coaches are Marcos ‘Parrumpa’ da Matta, Katel Kubis, and Luciano ‘Macarrao’ (‘Macarrão’) dos Santos. Conan Silveira is our head coach. They’re also my cornermen. Everton ‘Veve’ Oliveira handles my physical conditioning. My sparring partners are helping simulate my opponent’s game. Plans for the future? I’m fully dedicated to the PFL. After I finish out this year, we’ll see what the future holds. Anything else? I had a lot of fear last year because of my injury. But I had faith in my abilities, and that I could make my dream of being champion come true. I feel that God had his hand on my knee. For more on PFL 2019, Week 2, check out our Rumors page. Voir l'article complet
  3. Sage Northcutt isn’t fully recovered from extensive facial surgery, but he at least looks better. Last week, Northcutt suffered a brutal loss in his ONE Championship debut when he was knocked out with one punch by Cosmo Alexandre in just 29 seconds at ONE Championship 96. Even though the finish was devastating, with Northcutt face-planting onto the canvas, he appeared OK just a few minutes later. But the next day, Northcutt shared the news that he’d undergone a nine-hour surgery in Singapore to repair eight facial fractures. Four days later, on Wednesday, Northcutt followed up with an update, naturally seeming upbeat while also looking better than before (via <a href=" Still in the hospital recovering in Singapore getting better.. thanks for all the prayers! Northcutt didn’t provide a date for when he’d be released from the hospital or a timetable for his return to the cage. UFC Hall of Famer Urijah Faber, who was in Northcutt’s corner at ONE Championship 96, provided more context to the injury during an appearance this week on “The MMA Hour.” “Sage went one way and then the other way, first time in a ring, and literally gets manhunted with the nastiest punch and crushes his whole face,” Faber said. “Basically splintered his cheek into 30 pieces and broke his orbital bone. He had eight different fractures and literally they had to pick the pieces of the bone fragments out, 30 different pieces out of his face.” For more on ONE Championship 96, check out the MMA Events section of the site. Voir l'article complet
  4. MMA vet Damon Jackson once vowed to retire by age 30. Things haven’t gone according to plan, but he’s just fine with that. “Here I am at 30, and I couldn’t imagine doing anything else,” Jackson told MMA Junkie Radio in advance of his PFL debut opposite Movlid Khaybulaev on Thursday at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Uniondale, N.Y. A few years back, Jackson had an eye on the exit door. He’d fought through the regional circuit to earn a UFC contract, only to lose in his debut opposite Yancy Medeiros. His next opponent, Rony Jason, caught him in a triangle and then popped for a diuretic. A majority draw served as his walking papers. Jackson didn’t quit, though. A new contract with Legacy FC – and later LFA – proved the right move to revitalize his career. He went 7-1 with five straight stoppage finishes. Soon enough, a UFC feeder, Dana White’s Contender Series, called with an offer. But the gap between his fight was too long for a father of four children, so he accepted an invite to the PFL’s second season. “If I’m going to wait around that long, I’m going to go to PFL, because that’s a guaranteed payday,” he said. “You get two fights guaranteed, and if you win, you get a lot of money.” Like every other fighter on the PFL roster, the $1 million tournament prize is the ultimate goal for Jackson. UFC fighters have even inquired about his regular season fights. “If I’m out there putting as much work in as I do, I want it to be paying off,” he said. “I feel like fighters don’t get treated the right way in a lot of promotions, and I feel like people are starting to see that.” As he nears his promotional debut, Jackson is confident that all of his experience has served to ready him for this moment. He expects a wrestling-heavy fight against Khaybulaev, but he believes he’ll be able to catch his opponent in a submission. “I’ve definitely grown a lot as a fighter,” he said. For more on PFL 2019, Week 2, check out the MMA Rumors section of the site. Voir l'article complet
  5. The open-door policies which have led to interesting matchups between Bellator and Rizin competitors is giving us yet another intriguing fight. And this one will be held on one of MMA’s biggest stages. Rizin’s Rena Kubota will meet Bellator’s Lindsey VanZandtat Bellator 222 on June 14 at New York’s Madison Square Garden, the promotions announced Wednesday. The bout will be held at a catchweight of 112 pounds. Kubota (8-2 MMA; 7-2 Rizin) is a kickboxing and shoot boxing specialist out of Osaka, Japan. She was a finalist in the company’s 2017 super atom weight grand prix and has won two of her past three bouts, including a decision over Samantha Jean Francois at Rizin 15 on April 21. VanZandt (5-1 MMA; 1-0 BMMA), who fights out of upstate New York, was a TKO winner in her Bellator debut, as she finished Tabitha Ann Watkins at Bellator 215. Four of her five career victories are by way of KO or TKO. This is the second Bellator-Rizin crossover fight on the card, as Darrion Caldwell will fight Kyogi Horiguchi with Caldwell’s Bellator bantamweight belt on the line. This is a rematch of a New Year’s Eve fight in Japan won by Horiguchi for the inaugural Rizin bantamweight titleholder. The card, which is headlined by Lyoto Machida vs. Chael Sonnen, will stream on DAZN. For more on Bellator 222, visit the MMA Rumors page of the site. Voir l'article complet
  6. An unexpected last-minute snag has bumped veteran Ronys Torres off Thursday night’s PFL 2019: Week 2 card. Torres, who was scheduled to fight Ramsey Nijem at the Nassau Coliseum in Uniondale, N.Y., was denied licensure by the New York State Athletic Commission. In an Instagram post in Portuguese, Torres said the issue which caused his license denial was an eye surgery which he underwent in 2009. MMA Junkie confirmed the licensing issue with a source familiar with the proceedings. Related PFL 2019, Week 2 breakdown: Is Lance Palmer in for a surprise against newcomer Alex Gilpin? PFL's Glaico Franca doesn't know whether he'll return to the UFC, but is happy with life outside of it PFL 2019, Week 2 weigh-in results: One fighter pulled for 2019 season As a result of this decision, Nijem will not fight on Thursday, and will be awarded three points due to a walkover in the PFL’s lightweight regular-season standings. He will be paid his win and show money for the bout. For more on PFL 2019: Week 2, check out the Rumors section of the site. Voir l'article complet
  7. Bellator 221 didn’t exactly go according to plan for Michael Page. The sensational British striker known as “MVP” got caught and knocked out by the dangerous Douglas Lima in their welterweight grand prix semifinal bout, which made for Page’s first professional MMA loss. But the evening was a learning experience for “Venom,” who was philosophical about losing the former Bellator welterweight champion, and appeared to take all the right lessons out of his defeat. Check out the Bellator MMA video above, which shows Page’ fight day in Rosemont, Ill., from his arena arrival to the knockout in the fight to his cordial conversation with Lima in the backstage area after the bout to his discussion of what’s next. For more on the MMA schedule, check out our Events page. Voir l'article complet
  8. MMA veteran Joe Riggs is going to have to wait a bit to make his professional boxing debut. Riggs (50-18-1 MMA, 0-0 Boxing) was scheduled to fight in his home state of Arizona in a bout against David Damore (1-6-3 Boxing) on a Roy Jones Jr. Boxing Promotions event at Casino Del Sol’s AVA Amphitheater in Tucson. However, the promotion announced at Wednesday’s weigh-ins that Damore was pulled from the bout, and the fight was canceled. No reason was given for the decision. Related Khabib Nurmagomedov's teammates see suspensions reduced, clearing way for UFC 242 booking Juan Adams vs. Greg Hardy heading to July's UFC on ESPN 4 in Texas UFC 25 video: 'The Lion's Den – The Story of the First Mixed Martial Arts Team' While Riggs is off the card, the event itself is still on. Tunisia’s Ikram Kerwat (9-1 Boxing) headlines against nine-time world title challenger Simone Da Silva (15-12 Boxing) of Brazil for the vacant WBC silver female lightweight championship. The fight card will stream live on UFC Fight Pass. Gallery Photos: UFC, Bellator and more MMA ring card girls through the years Voir l'article complet
  9. UFC officials recently announced that the promotion’s Emmy-nominated short film series, “UFC 25 Years in Short,” is no longer exclusive to UFC Fight Pass. Originally released in 2018, the compilation of 25 short films was produced to celebrate the UFC’s 25th anniversary. In April, the docuseries received a Sports Emmy Award nomination in the “Outstanding Edited Sports Special or Series” category. “‘UFC 25 Years in Short’ premiered on UFC Fight Pass in fall of 2018, so the time is right to showcase it to a new audience,” UFC senior vice president of production and programming Chris Kartzmark stated. On Wednesday, the promotion released the third film in the series, “ULTIMATE ACCESSORY: The Story of the UFC Championship Belt.” The official description, courtesy of the UFC: First introduced in 1995, UFC championship belts have become the sport’s ultimate accessory. This is the surprising history of the prize sought by all MMA fighters. Check out the full video above. The Blue Corner is MMA Junkie’s blog space. We don’t take it overly serious, and neither should you. If you come complaining to us that something you read here is not hard-hitting news, expect to have the previous sentence repeated in ALL CAPS. Voir l'article complet
  10. UFC officials recently announced that the promotion’s Emmy-nominated short film series, “UFC 25 Years in Short,” is no longer exclusive to UFC Fight Pass. Originally released in 2018, the compilation of 25 short films was produced to celebrate the UFC’s 25th anniversary. In April, the docuseries received a Sports Emmy Award nomination in the “Outstanding Edited Sports Special or Series” category. “‘UFC 25 Years in Short’ premiered on UFC Fight Pass in fall of 2018, so the time is right to showcase it to a new audience,” UFC senior vice president of production and programming Chris Kartzmark stated. On Wednesday, the promotion released the third film in the series, “ULTIMATE ACCESSORY: The Story of the UFC Championship Belt.” The official description, courtesy of the UFC: First introduced in 1995, UFC championship belts have become the sport’s ultimate accessory. This is the surprising history of the prize sought by all MMA fighters. Check out the full video above. The Blue Corner is MMA Junkie’s blog space. We don’t take it overly serious, and neither should you. If you come complaining to us that something you read here is not hard-hitting news, expect to have the previous sentence repeated in ALL CAPS. Voir l'article complet
  11. MMA Junkie Radio kicks off tonight at 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) with special guests Jim Ross, Ian Heinisch, and Yves Edwards. Legendary broadcaster Ross joins in-studio in Las Vegas, as he’s in town for Saturday night’s All Elite Wrestling “Double or Nothing” pay-per-view from the MGM Grand. Heinisch will discuss his impressive win over Antonio Carlos Junior at UFC Rochester, while Edwards, the retired former lightweight standout and current PFL broadcaster, will talk Thursday night’s PFL 2019, Week 2 card. MMA Junkie Radio airs from 8 to 10 p.m. ET (5-7 p.m. PT), live from Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino in Las Vegas. You can watch and listen live above or on MMA Junkie’s YouTube page. Additionally, SiriusXM Fight Nation (Ch. 156) airs the show live, or you can catch an on-demand replay on the SiriusXM app. MMA Junkie Radio listener guide: HOW TO WATCH (ONLINE): Watch a live stream on MMA Junkie’s YouTube page. HOW TO CALL: MMA Junkie Radio takes phone calls from listeners throughout the show. Call the MMA Junkie Radio hotline at (866) 522-2846. HOW TO VISIT THE SHOW: You can watch MMA Junkie Radio live and in person at Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino on the world-famous Las Vegas Strip. The booth is located in the resort’s sports book next to the Mandalay Bay poker room. To plan a trip to Sin City and MMAjunkie Radio, go to www.mandalaybay.com. (Note: You must be 21 or older to enter the casino.) HOW TO INTERACT: Follow MMA Junkie Radio on your favorite social-media platforms, including Twitter, Facebookand Instagram. HOW TO SUBSCRIBE: Never miss an episode of MMA Junkie by subscribing via iTunes, Stitcher or Audioboom. Voir l'article complet
  12. MMA Junkie Radio kicks off tonight at 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) with special guests Jim Ross, Ian Heinisch, and Yves Edwards. Legendary broadcaster Ross joins in-studio in Las Vegas, as he’s in town for Saturday night’s All Elite Wrestling “Double or Nothing” pay-per-view from the MGM Grand. Heinisch will discuss his impressive win over Antonio Carlos Junior at UFC Rochester, while Edwards, the retired former lightweight standout and current PFL broadcaster, will talk Thursday night’s PFL 2019, Week 2 card. MMA Junkie Radio airs from 8 to 10 p.m. ET (5-7 p.m. PT), live from Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino in Las Vegas. You can watch and listen live above or on MMA Junkie’s YouTube page. Additionally, SiriusXM Fight Nation (Ch. 156) airs the show live, or you can catch an on-demand replay on the SiriusXM app. MMA Junkie Radio listener guide: HOW TO WATCH (ONLINE): Watch a live stream on MMA Junkie’s YouTube page. HOW TO CALL: MMA Junkie Radio takes phone calls from listeners throughout the show. Call the MMA Junkie Radio hotline at (866) 522-2846. HOW TO VISIT THE SHOW: You can watch MMA Junkie Radio live and in person at Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino on the world-famous Las Vegas Strip. The booth is located in the resort’s sports book next to the Mandalay Bay poker room. To plan a trip to Sin City and MMAjunkie Radio, go to www.mandalaybay.com. (Note: You must be 21 or older to enter the casino.) HOW TO INTERACT: Follow MMA Junkie Radio on your favorite social-media platforms, including Twitter, Facebookand Instagram. HOW TO SUBSCRIBE: Never miss an episode of MMA Junkie by subscribing via iTunes, Stitcher or Audioboom. Voir l'article complet
  13. PFL’s second season continues Thursday, with PFL 2019, Week 2 at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Uniondale, N.Y. In the night’s main event, the 2018 featherweight champion, Lance Palmer (17-3), begins his 2019 campaign against promotional newcomer Alex Gilpin (12-1). After banking $1 million in 2018 as the 145-pound season champion, Palmer certainly comes in as the favorite? But Gilpin has experience as a winner under the Dana White’s Contender Series banner, and his lone career loss came to current UFC fighter Dan Moret. Does he have what it takes to pull an early upset against the returning champion? Watch the video above to hear the MMA Junkie Radio crew’s breakdown and predictions. The PFL 2019, Week 2 main card streams live on ESPN+ following prelims on ESPN2. For more on PFL 2019, Week 2, check out the MMA Rumors section of the site. MMA Junkie Radio broadcasts Monday-Friday at 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) live from Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino’s Race & Sports Book. The show is hosted by “Gorgeous” George Garcia, Brian “Goze” Garcia and Dan Tom. For more information or to download past episodes, go to www.mmajunkie.com/radio. You can also check out www.siriusxm.com/siriusxmfightnation. Voir l'article complet
  14. PFL’s second season continues Thursday, with PFL 2019, Week 2 at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Uniondale, N.Y. In the night’s main event, the 2018 featherweight champion, Lance Palmer (17-3), begins his 2019 campaign against promotional newcomer Alex Gilpin (12-1). After banking $1 million in 2018 as the 145-pound season champion, Palmer certainly comes in as the favorite? But Gilpin has experience as a winner under the Dana White’s Contender Series banner, and his lone career loss came to current UFC fighter Dan Moret. Does he have what it takes to pull an early upset against the returning champion? Watch the video above to hear the MMA Junkie Radio crew’s breakdown and predictions. The PFL 2019, Week 2 main card streams live on ESPN+ following prelims on ESPN2. For more on PFL 2019, Week 2, check out the MMA Rumors section of the site. MMA Junkie Radio broadcasts Monday-Friday at 8 p.m. ET (5 p.m. PT) live from Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino’s Race & Sports Book. The show is hosted by “Gorgeous” George Garcia, Brian “Goze” Garcia and Dan Tom. For more information or to download past episodes, go to www.mmajunkie.com/radio. You can also check out www.siriusxm.com/siriusxmfightnation. Voir l'article complet
  15. It’s been two-and-a-half years, but Glaico Franca still remembers the details of the day when he found out he was no longer a UFC fighter. The exact date was Oct. 26, 2016. He remembers, because it was about a month after his UFC Fight Night 95 meeting with Gregor Gillespie. Franca dropped a unanimous decision to Gillespie – which, paired with a decision loss to James Vick earlier that year, made for a two-fight skid. It was a little more than one year after a win over Fernanda Bruno saw France crowned the 155-pound winner of “The Ultimate Fighter: Brazil 4.” Franca recalls the time of the day in which he got the news, too. It was morning, before practice. His head coach, Marcelo Brigadeiro, who’s also his manager, was the one to break it to him. “We sat down, and he said, ‘I have something to tell you: Unfortunately, the UFC ended your contract,’” Franca said. Ask any fighter who’s been in this same spot to explain how it feels, and you’ll get all types of answers. Some will tell you they were in shock. Some will tell you they had kind of seen it coming. Some will tell you they were hoping for another chance. Some will tell you they were actually relieved. Some will tell you they didn’t even think about it that much, to be honest. Sometimes, despite how much life we know there is outside of the UFC, you’ll hear about a “what now?” kind of moment. These fighters had, after all, made it to what is widely perceived as the pinnacle of their chosen profession. What do you do when you make it to the final step of a set of stairs, only to find out it just … kind of ends there? But, for Franca, there was no “what now” moment. The first thing he did was ask his manager to reply to the UFC’s email directly. The reason was that he wanted to thank them. He’d always dreamed of not only making it to the UFC, he said, but to do it via “TUF.” His octagon stint was brief, but it was enough to launch his name beyond his local community. Franca was appreciative of the opportunity and just wanted to make sure they knew it. After – as in, immediately after – the message was sent? “I trained like a monster,” Franca said. Franca (20-5) knew that being cut was a possibility after the loss to Gillespie – who, incidentally, has gone on to finish every opponent that he’s crossed paths with in the octagon thus far. After a particularly grueling cut down to 155 pounds, however, Franca did hold out hope that the UFC might offer him a chance to prove himself at welterweight. Obviously, that didn’t happen. But coming to terms with that was no problem for Franca, who had no interest in moping over the past. “I think, in MMA and life, there’s no time for that; you shouldn’t sulk over things that happened,” Franca said. “Some things are up to you, and some aren’t. At that moment, what was up to me? Moving up to 170 and fighting better, because I’d have less weight to cut. I talked to my team, and that’s what we did. We changed what was wrong and went from there.” There’s no telling what would have happened if he’d had that second chance in the UFC. As far as what’s happened outside of it since, though, the proof is in the pudding. Franca would go back into the cage the following January, at local promotion Aspera FC 49. He’d finish four opponents there before making his way to Pancrase, where he became welterweight champion after two fights. Then, Franca joined PFL’s second season, which he kicked off with a first-round submission of Gamzat Khiramagomedov at PFL 2019, Week 1 earlier this month. That fight against Gillespie was Franca’s last at lightweight. It was also the last loss of his professional career. But a weight change isn’t all there was to Franca’s transition from that raw “TUF” winner to a streaking Pancrase champion. There was a lot of life in between, too. “I’ve evolved in my professional and in my personal life – they go hand-in-hand, I truly believe that,” Franca said. “I improved my English. I spent some time in the U.S. training wrestling. I went to Japan, where I’d never been, and I did some tough fights there. I had a desire and a dream of fighting in Pancrase and meeting Japan. “Technically, I evolved a lot. I evolved a lot in my striking. I already had a good ground game, but I improved it even more. My wrestling, I’ve improved my transitions and I learned a lot of new stuff. Technically speaking, I’m a lot better than I was in 2016. I’ve lived more, too, … and I’m very happy, you know? I’m very happy at PFL. But, most importantly, I’m a guy who’s happy doing what he does.” Thoroughly satisfied with the present and the road he’s taken to get here, the 28-year-old Brazilian is careful not to let his mind wander too far into the future – more specifically, into a future that might involve him becoming a millionaire. Raised “in the real world” by his two teacher parents, Franca has learned to stay grounded and focus on what’s tangible and within his reach. And, at least for now, that $1 million check that PFL notoriously awards each of its divisional winners isn’t. “I don’t think about the million because that, until you make it to the final and win, is not concrete,” Franca said, “What’s concrete is my next fight, so I’m awaiting my next opponent to be decided. I think about my next fight. It’s step by step.” Franca’s approach to his future within PFL, it turns out, is quite in line with the one he holds in regards to the possibilities of an eventual future outside of it. At one point, even as recently as after his last Pancrase win, Franca says he had aspirations to return to the UFC. But, after watching one of his teammates compete in the inaugural season of PFL last year, he liked what he saw. His good impression has been confirmed by what he’s experienced, personally, since officially hopping on board. Franca really likes PFL, and he believes the feeling is mutual. At least for the time being, that’s all that he needs to know. “I won’t say I will never want to go back to the UFC,” Franca said. “Like I said, I like PFL and I like the UFC. What I can say is that I’m doing great, and I’m very happy with PFL, and let’s see what will happen this year before we think about the next step. “For now, PFL is my home, I’m very happy in it, and I’m not thinking about finding a new one.” For more on the upcoming PFL schedule, check out the MMA Rumors section of the site. Voir l'article complet

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